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Family Fun Tie Dye Project


We’re all familiar with the tie-dye swirls made popular in the 1960s by rockers like Janis Joplin. But the tie-dye trend actually began with the Japanese technique of Shibori. This ancient style of dying is making a comeback, thanks to the beautiful and unique designs it creates on fabric using natural indigo dye.

Whether you’re in the mood for a colorful DIY project to try with the kids or simply want to exercise your DIY muscles, check out these Shibori methods and get dying!


Arashi Shiborishibori_arashi

For a diagonal, slash-like tie-dye pattern that looks similar to rainfall, try the Arashi method of Shibori.

Materials:

  • Cotton fabric (i.e. t-shirts, pillow cases, tablecloths)
  • PVC pipe or cylinder
  • Thin wire or thread
  • Dye

Directions: Also known as pole wrapping. Wrap the fabric in a diagonal motion around a cylinder, such as a PVC pipe or pole. Bind tightly with thin wire or thread. Scrunch the cloth down on the cylinder, and dye.


Kumo Shiborishibori_kumo

To see a distinct, spider-like tie-dye design in your fabric, try the Kumo method.

Materials:

  • Cotton fabric (i.e. t-shirts, pillow cases, tablecloths)
  • Thin wire or thread
  • Dye

Directions: Pleat or fold the fabric in tight folds and bind closely together with thin wire or thread, then dye.


Itajime Shiborishibori_itajime

For a more random pattern, try Itajime. It will create a distinct look based on the shape the fabric is held in.

Materials:

  • Cotton fabric (i.e. t-shirts, pillow cases, tablecloths)
  • Two pieces of wood
  • Clamps
  • Dye

Directions: Fold the cloth like an accordion and secure it between two pieces of wood, in any shape that you would like. Hold together with clamps. Dye.


Kanoko Shiborishibori_kanoko

Another way to achieve a more random pattern is with Kanoko. It will also create a pattern based on the way the fabric is secured.

Materials:

  • Cotton fabric (i.e. t-shirts, pillow cases, tablecloths)
  • Rubber bands
  • Dye

Directions: The most recognizable tie-dye pattern. Fold random sections of fabric and secure with a rubber band. The amount of color that is transferred will depend on how tightly the fabric is bound. When finished securing the sections, start the dyeing process.


We’d love to see your unique creation! Share your before and after photos with us on Instagram and Facebook. #ALMcrafts

For more summertime DIY activities, visit www.americanlifestylemag.com/summer.